Maldives 1000 Rufiyaa Polymer Banknote 2015

Maldives 1000 Rufiyaa Polymer Banknote 2015 Sea turtle

Maldives 1000 Rufiyaa Plastic banknotes 2015 Whale shark

Maldives 1000 Rufiyaa Polymer Banknote 2015

Obverse: Underprint of yellow spot and striped pattern on the skin of whale sharks; denomination as registration device; Manta rays (Manta alfredi); Green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas); corals SPARK patch; luxury resort.
Reverse (Vertical): Whale shark (Rhincodon typus).

Colour of note: Blue - Blue is used to represent our oceans that provide an ideal environment for rare species, some that are considered endangered, and are protected all over the world.
The notes carry the signature of governor Dr Azeema Adam making it the first time in Maldives' history a woman had signed currency notes.

Face value: 1000 Maldivian rufiyaa.
Theme: The beauty in our surrounding.
Size: 150 x 70 mm.
Composition: Polymer.
Printer: De La Rue, London (England) - DLR.

Maldives New Family of Polymer Banknotes
Maldives Monetary Authority 2015 Issue (2016)
Maldives new currency series, called ”Ran dhiha faheh” (the golden five decades). “Ran dhiha faheh” currency series includes MVR 10, 20, 50, 100, 500 and the brand new MVR 1000. The series also introduced MVR 5 as coins instead of the current cash note. The series was designed by local designer Abdulla Nashath.

  Maldives central bank said “Ran dhiha faheh” series is printed on polymer paper and are state-of-the-art, impossible to counterfeit. Maldives Monetary authority (MMA) also said each note has been given a distinct topic and a representative colour for ease of use. The series as a whole attempts to encapsulate all the innate factors that define our country, and our ancestral identity, MMA said.

10 Rufiyaa        20 Rufiyaa        50 Rufiyaa        100 Rufiyaa      

500 Rufiyaa         1000 Rufiyaa






Green sea turtle
The green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas), also known as the green turtle, black (sea) turtle, or Pacific green turtle, is a large sea turtle of the family Cheloniidae. This species is named for the green color of its fat, rather than the color of its skin of shell as most people think. These turtles shells are in fact olive to black. It is the only species in the genus Chelonia. Its range extends throughout tropical and subtropical seas around the world, with two distinct populations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The common name comes from the usually green fat found beneath its carapace.
  This sea turtle's dorsoventrally flattened body is covered by a large, teardrop-shaped carapace; it has a pair of large, paddle-like flippers. It is usually lightly colored, although in the eastern Pacific populations parts of the carapace can be almost black. Unlike other members of its family, such as the hawksbill sea turtle, C. mydas is mostly herbivorous. The adults usually inhabit shallow lagoons, feeding mostly on various species of seagrasses. The turtles bite off the tips of the blades of seagrass, which keeps the grass healthy.
  Like other sea turtles, green sea turtles migrate long distances between feeding grounds and hatching beaches. Many islands worldwide are known as Turtle Island due to green sea turtles nesting on their beaches. Females crawl out on beaches, dig nests and lay eggs during the night. Later, hatchlings emerge and scramble into the water. Those that reach maturity may live to eighty years in the wild.
  Chelonia mydas is listed as endangered by the IUCN and CITES and is protected from exploitation in most countries. It is illegal to collect, harm or kill them. In addition, many countries have laws and ordinances to protect nesting areas. However, turtles are still in danger due to human activity. In some countries, turtles and their eggs are hunted for food. Pollution indirectly harms turtles at both population and individual scales. Many turtles die caught in fishing nets. Also, real estate development often causes habitat loss by eliminating nesting beaches.

Manta rays
Manta rays are large rays belonging to the genus Manta. The larger species, Manta birostris, reaches 7 m (23 ft 0 in) in width while the smaller, Manta alfredi, reaches 5.5 m (18 ft 1 in). Both have triangular pectoral fins, horn-shaped cephalic fins and large, forward-facing mouths. They are classified among the Elasmobranchii (sharks and rays) and are placed in the family Myliobatidae (eagle rays).
  Mantas are found in temperate, subtropical and tropical waters. Both species are pelagic; Manta birostris migrates across open oceans, singly or in groups, while M. alfredi tends to be resident and coastal. They are filter feeders and eat large quantities of zooplankton, which they swallow with their open mouths as they swim. Gestation lasts over a year, producing live pups. Mantas may visit cleaning stations for the removal of parasites. Like whales, they breach, for unknown reasons.
  Both species are listed as vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Anthropogenic threats include pollution, entanglement in fishing nets, and direct harvesting for their gill rakers for use in Chinese medicine. Their slow reproductive rate exacerbates these threats. They are protected in international waters by the Convention on Migratory Species of Wild Animals, but are more vulnerable closer to shore. Areas where mantas congregate are popular with tourists. Only a few aquariums are large enough to house them. In general, these large fish are seldom seen and difficult to study.

Whale shark
The whale shark (Rhincodon typus) is a slow-moving filter feeding shark and the largest known extant fish species. The largest confirmed individual had a length of 12.65 m (41.5 ft) and a weight of about 21.5 t (47,000 lb), and unconfirmed reports of considerably larger whale sharks exist. Claims of individuals over 14 m (46 ft) long and weighing at least 30 t (66,000 lb) are not uncommon. The whale shark holds many records for sheer size in the animal kingdom, most notably being by far the largest living nonmammalian vertebrate. It is the sole member of the genus Rhincodon and the family, Rhincodontidae (called Rhiniodon and Rhinodontidae before 1984), which belongs to the subclass Elasmobranchii in the class Chondrichthyes. The species originated about 60 million years ago.
  The whale shark is found in open waters of the tropical oceans and is rarely found in water below 22 °C (72 °F). Modeling suggests a lifespan of about 70 years but measurements have proven difficult. Whale sharks have very large mouths and are filter feeders, which is a feeding mode that occurs in only two other sharks, the megamouth shark and the basking shark. They feed mainly on plankton and are generally considered harmless to humans.
  The species was distinguished in April 1828 after the harpooning of a 4.6 m (15 ft) specimen in Table Bay, South Africa. Andrew Smith, a military doctor associated with British troops stationed in Cape Town, described it the following year. The name "whale shark" comes from the fish's size, being as large as some species of whales and also that it is a filter feeder like baleen whales.