Germany 5 Deutsche Mark banknote 1991 Bettina von Arnim

5 Deutsche Mark banknote
5 Deutsche Mark banknote Brandenburg Gate Berlin
German banknotes 5 DM Deutsche Mark banknote 1991, issued by the Deutsche Bundesbank - German Federal Bank
5 Deutsche Mark old German pre-euro bank note.
German banknotes, German mark banknotes, Deutsche Mark, German paper money, German bank notes, Germany banknotes, Germany paper money, Germany bank notes, German currency, German East African banknotes, German Rentenmark.

Obverse: Portrait of Bettina von Arnim, Wiepersdorf estate and buildings of historic Berlin, Horn, symbolizing "Des Knaben Wunderhorn" (collection of popular songs and poems published by her brother Clemens von Brentano and her husband Achim von Arnim)
Reverse: Brandenburg Gate, Script from Bettina von Arnim's correspondence with Goethe ("Briefwechsel mit einem Kinde")


Germany banknotes - Germany paper money
Deutsche Bundesbank - German Federal Bank
1989-1996 issue

The fourth series of German mark banknotes was introduced in 1990 by the Bundesbank to counter advances in forgery technology. The notes depicted German artists and scientists together with symbols and tools of their trade. There were 5 Deutsche Mark, 10 Deutsche Mark, 20 Deutsche Mark, 50 Deutsche Mark100 Deutsche Mark, 200 Deutsche Mark500 Deutsche Mark and 1000 Deutsche Mark denominations.








Bettina von Arnim
Bettina von Arnim (the Countess of Arnim) (4 April 1785 – 20 January 1859), born Elisabeth Catharina Ludovica Magdalena Brentano, was a German writer and novelist.
Bettina (as well: Bettine) Brentano was a writer, publisher, composer, singer, visual artist, an illustrator, patron of young talent, and a social activist. She was the archetype of the Romantic era’s zeitgeist and the crux of many creative relationships of canonical artistic figures. Best known for the company she kept, she numbered among her closest friends Goethe, Beethoven, and P├╝ckler and tried to foster artistic agreement among them. Many leading composers of the time, including Robert Schumann, Franz Liszt, Johanna Kinkel, and Johannes Brahms, admired her spirit and talents. As a composer, von Arnim's style was unconventional, molding and melding favorite folk melodies and historical themes with innovative harmonies, phrase lengths, and improvisations that became synonymous with the music of the era. She was closely related to the German writers Clemens Brentano and Achim von Arnim: the first was her brother, the second her husband. Her daughter Gisela von Arnim became a prominent writer as well.

Brandenburg Gate
The Brandenburg Gate (German: Brandenburger Tor) is a former city gate, rebuilt in the late 18th century as a neoclassical triumphal arch, and now one of the most well-known landmarks of Germany.
It is located in the western part of the city centre of Berlin, at the junction of Unter den Linden and Ebertstra├če, immediately west of the Pariser Platz. One block to the north stands the Reichstag building. The gate is the monumental entry to Unter den Linden, the renowned boulevard of linden trees, which formerly led directly to the city palace of the Prussian monarchs.
It was commissioned by King Frederick William II of Prussia as a sign of peace and built by Carl Gotthard Langhans from 1788 to 1791. Having suffered considerable damage in World War II, the Brandenburg Gate was fully restored from 2000 to 2002 by the Stiftung Denkmalschutz Berlin (Berlin Monument Conservation Foundation).
During the post-war Partition of Germany, the gate was isolated and inaccessible immediately next to the Berlin Wall, and the area around the gate featured most prominently in the media coverage of the opening of the wall in 1989.
Throughout its existence, the Brandenburg Gate was often a site for major historical events and is today considered a symbol of the tumultuous history of Europe and Germany, but also of European unity and peace.