1891 One Hundred Dollar Silver Certificate

US currency 1891 One Hundred Dollar Silver Certificate
Large-Size U.S. Paper Money - 1891 One Hundred Dollar Silver Certificate - Large-Size Silver Certificates
American money 100 Dollars Large-Size Silver Certificates

Paper Money of the United States: 1891 One Hundred Dollar Silver Certificate

Obverse: Bust of James Monroe, fifth President of the United States, 1817-1825.
Reverse: Ornate floral design.
Signatures: (as depicted) James Fount Tillman (Register of the Treasury) Daniel Nash Morgan (Treasurer of the United States).


Inscriptions:  Silver Certificate  -  Series 1891  -  Act of February 28th 1878  -  Bureau of Engraving and Printing  -  Register Of The Treasury  -  Treasurer Of The United States  -  This Certifies That There Have Been Deposited In The Treasury Of The United States One Hundred Silver Dollars Payable To Bearer On Demand Washington, D.C.  -  United States Silver Certificate  -  Amer Septent Sigil Thesaur  -  This Certificate Is Receivable For Customs, Taxes and All Public Dues, And When So Received May Be Reissued

James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth President of the United States (1817–1825). Monroe was the last president who was a Founding Father of the United States, the third of them to die on Independence Day, and the last president from the Virginia dynasty and the Republican Generation.

J. Fount Tillman (1854 – March, 1899) was the eighth Register of the Treasury, and served during the second term of President Grover Cleveland. As Register of the Treasury, Tillman's signature appeared on US currency issued between July 1, 1893 and December 2, 1897.
Daniel Nash Morgan (August 18, 1844 – May 30, 1931) was a United States banker who was Treasurer of the United States from 1893 to 1897.