1864 One Hundred Dollar Compound Interest Treasury Note

US paper money 1864 One Hundred Dollar Compound Interest Bearing Note

1864 100 Dollar Compound Interest Treasury Note
1864 $100 Compound Interest Treasury Note
United States paper money - 1864 One Hundred Dollar Compound Interest Treasury Note

Obverse: Standing figure of George Washington between female allegories representing The Guardian, left, and Justice, right. Large bronzing overprints of "100, COMPOUND INTEREST, TREASURY NOTE," at center. Red overprinted date of July 15, 1864 below type 1 treasury seal.
Reverse: Ornate Engraved Design.
Signatures: (as depicted) Lucius E. Chittenden (Register of the Treasury) Francis Elias Spinner (Treasurer of the United States).




Inscriptions:  This Note Is A Legal Tender For One Hundred Dollars  -  Treasury Department  -  Act of June 30th 1864  -  Three Years After Date The United States Will Pay The Bearer With Interest At The Rate Of Six Percent Interest Per Annum Compounded Semi-Annually One Hundred Dollars  -  Treasury Note  -  Register Of The Treasury  -  Treasurer Of The United States  -  By Act of Congress this Note is a Legal Tender for One Hundred Dollars but bears Interest at six percent compounded every six months though payable only at maturity as follows.

COMPOUND INTEREST TREASURY NOTES

These notes are really Legal Tender circulating notes, which for a period of three years, bore interest at six per cent, that was compounded twice a year. The Acts of Congress of March 3, 1863 and June 30,1864 authorized the issue by the Treasury Department of these notes. It should be noted that the time of issue was late in the Civil War when the financial position of the Treasury was precarious and the country was almost bankrupt be cause of the cost of carrying on the war. Money was very rare and the issue of these Compound Interpounded twice a year. The Acts of Congress of March 3, 1863 and June 30, 1864 authorized the issue by the Treasury Department of these notes. It should be noted that the time of issue was late in the Civil War when the financial position of the Treasury was precarious and the country was almost bankrupt be cause of the cost of carrying on the war. Money was very rare and the issue of these Compound Interest Treasury Notes was an attempt to alleviate this pressing problem.
   They were issued in denominations of 10, 20, 50, 100, 500 and 1,000 Dollars, and were legal tender at their face value. The date of issue is printed in red on each note and the full interest was payable only at the end of the three year period after date of issue.
   The reverse of each denomination shows in tabular form what the interest and redemption value was at the end of each six month period for the three years.  For the redemption value of each denomination, please see the text.
   The obverse of each note is surcharged in large gold letters with “Compound Interest Treasury Note” and the numerals of the denomination.
  All notes of this issue are very rare today and are seldom seen. The 50 and 100 Dollar notes are of extraordinary rarity. Also, all denominations are extremely rare in really choice condition.
  The obligation on these Compound Interest Treasury Notes is as follows, “Three years after date the United States will pay the bearer...... dollars with interest at the rate of six per cent com pounded semiannually ... By Act of Congress, this note is a legal tender for...... dollars but bears interest at six per cent compounded every six months though payable only at maturity as follows ... This sum $...... will be paid the holder for principal and interest at maturity of note three years from date.